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Crosswords and other puzzles

For discussion of all forms of mental gymnastics, especially that baffling final clue

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by Neil T - Thu 12th Mar 2009, 8:43pm
Is it Wendy Fatladysings? It is now.

From today's Guardian:

Unpleasant person in gardener, perhaps, in trouble when in this? (3,5)
by gf - Thu 12th Mar 2009, 3:00pm
the answer's a dirty word
exactly
by RTT - Thu 12th Mar 2009, 3:00pm
I'm bored of this topic.

Arty sister meets "Big Boy" with yen to spill beans on leader of Senate; then it's over (5, 12).
by Neil T - Wed 11th Mar 2009, 11:00pm
gf said: Tardy row? I'd transfer to Oxford, perhaps? [1,5,4]
No idea, but I bet the answer's a dirty word.
by gf - Wed 11th Mar 2009, 11:57am
Tardy row? I'd transfer to Oxford, perhaps? [1,5,4]
by Tom C - Sat 7th Mar 2009, 8:52pm
Gen Melchett said: "Require" is not a dirty word.

"Frigging" is a dirty word.

The answer to your clue, Tom, is a positively disgusting word. Private Eye, by any chance?
How can a polite synonym of a "dirty" word be "positively disgusting"?
by Gen Melchett - Fri 6th Mar 2009, 7:23pm
RTT said: Require isn't a rude word is it? Or am I just not down with the kids?
"Require" is not a dirty word.

"Frigging" is a dirty word.

The answer to your clue, Tom, is a positively disgusting word. Private Eye, by any chance?
by RTT - Fri 6th Mar 2009, 12:33pm
Require isn't a rude word is it? Or am I just not down with the kids?
by Need about twenty five sheets of paper (7) - Thu 5th Mar 2009, 5:27pm
gf said: Loud boat setup is mildly offensive [8]
It's not obdurate (anagram of rude=loud and boat) is it?
by gf - Thu 5th Mar 2009, 4:18pm
RTT said: No.

Cock.
Loud boat setup is mildly offensive [8]
by RTT - Thu 5th Mar 2009, 4:04pm
DM said: Is this just some elaborate way of posting rude words on the message board?
No.

Cock.
by DM - Thu 5th Mar 2009, 4:02pm
RTT said: Satisfy yourself mother's butter is runny without one (10)
Is this just some elaborate way of posting rude words on the message board?
by RTT - Thu 5th Mar 2009, 3:37pm
Satisfy yourself mother's butter is runny without one (10)
by Mike - Thu 15th Mar 2007, 10:02am
I've never bothered to call in, but... said: I heard somewhere that at busy times, the chance of a caller getting through could be as high as 10,000:1.
That's better odds than Blue Peter, where you actually need to be visiting the studio to win a competition...
by Joff - Thu 15th Mar 2007, 9:10am
I've never bothered to call in, but... said: ...could be as high as 10,000:1...
Is that because they'd already closed the phone lines?!

Maybe you've found your calling Richard - late night trivia shows ;)
by I've never bothered to call in, but... - Wed 14th Mar 2007, 8:22pm
Simon said: Bear in mind that at one stage during the broadcast this would have earnt you £30k:
That's if you managed to get through. I heard somewhere that at busy times, the chance of a caller getting through could be as high as 10,000:1.
by even better.. - Wed 14th Mar 2007, 8:08pm
Really stretching the numbers to fit the answer said: then write down further figures with the leading digits removed: 0p, 5p, 47p, 6p, 0p (total 58p)
then again write down further figures with another leading digit removed: 0p, 0p, 7p, 0p, 0p (total 7p)
What I really don't get is the justification of this bit..? surely '16' is '16' not '16+6'? I can kind of accept the rest of it..
the 'official' answer (according to the Telegraph) seems even weirder:

"Two pounds is 200p plus 2p (two p) [no further justiication given] and 1p (at the beginning of 'pounds') makes 203p

25p: 25p plus 5p and 1p (the 'p' in the question) = 31p

£1.47 = 147p

16p: 16p plus 6p and 1p = 23p

Fifty pence: 50p plus 50p (fifty p, a shortening of pence), 1p (reference to pence) and 1p (from the 'p') = 102p

203+31+147+23+102 = 506
by Simon - Wed 14th Mar 2007, 8:00pm
Really stretching the numbers to fit the answer said: A convoluted way of looking at it
Wll done Richard - that's about it. ITV have now published the official result. Bear in mind that at one stage during the broadcast this would have earnt you £30k:
ITV explained that the answer could be reached by breaking up the figures in the list to find all the references to pence. Thus:

-Two pounds is 200p plus 2p (two p) and 1p (p at the beginning of 'pounds') which makes 203p

-25p: 25p plus 5p and 1p (the p symbol) = 31p £1.47 = 147p

-6p: 16p plus 6p and 1p (p again) = 23p

-Fifty pence: 50p plus 50p (fifty p, a shortening of pence), 1p (reference to pence) and 1p (p only) = 102p

-Adding 203p, 31p, 147p, 23p and 102p gives a total of 506p
by Really stretching the numbers to fit the answer - Wed 14th Mar 2007, 7:23pm
Simon said: As this is crosswords and other puzzles, here's one from ITVPlay, currently subject to inevstigation by Ofcom:
A graphic asked viewers to "Add the pence" from "Two pounds, 25p, £1.47, 16p, Fifty pence".
More than three hours later, the host announced the answer was 506 and that no-one had won. No method was given. ITV has denied the problem was particularly complex but has not commented further.
A convoluted way of looking at it

£2
25p
£1.47
16p
50p

write them in pence: 200p, 25p, 147p, 16p, 50p (total 438p)
then write down further figures with the leading digits removed: 0p, 5p, 47p, 6p, 0p (total 58p)
then again write down further figures with another leading digit removed: 0p, 0p, 7p, 0p, 0p (total 7p)

The sum of these three subtotals = 503p

Now look back at the question. Add the pence:

Two pounds, 25p, £1.47, 16p. 50pence

There are 3 p or pence listed. Add this to the toal that we already had.

506p - simple.
by Does this make me a genius? - Mon 12th Mar 2007, 9:26pm
The Times Online said: ..a puzzle intended for an early-hours viewing audience of drunks and poor sleepers...
... A reader of The Times said [about the show] ...
Good to see the Times has so much respect for its readership!

As for how you get to 506..
Add two pounds worth of old money (2 * 20 shillings/pounds * 12 pence/shilling) to the other numbers in pence = 718
Subtract the 75p you spent calling in your answer = 643
This leaves you £1.37, which is taken into account by the 40.77 minutes you spent complaining to ITVPlay, or the 19.57 minutes complaining to OFCOM = 506p. Obvious.
by Simon - Mon 12th Mar 2007, 4:09pm
As this is crosswords and other puzzles, here's one from ITVPlay, currently subject to inevstigation by Ofcom:
A graphic asked viewers to "Add the pence" from "Two pounds, 25p, £1.47, 16p, Fifty pence".
More than three hours later, the host announced the answer was 506 and that no-one had won. No method was given. ITV has denied the problem was particularly complex but has not commented further.
by Highest common factor - Fri 9th Mar 2007, 9:46am
Nice. I can't come up with anything to follow that though.
by Neil T - Fri 9th Mar 2007, 8:55am
Fabulous Ming's hot coach of term: number one for two thousand and seven? (7, 6, 6)
I'll take the stony silence as a request for hints, so here you go:

1) No specialist knowledge is required; anyone at the club (or not at the club) could solve this.

2) Unlike the clue, the answer has nothing to do with rowing.

3) If I'm honest, 'Fabulous' wasn't a great choice of word. It enhances the surface reading but is a bit dubious in the cryptic reading. Better would have been "Staggering Ming's...".
by Neil T - Thu 8th Mar 2007, 12:53am
RTT said: ...(not that I can see a great deal of use for it here).
I think the 1st Men might disagree with that.

So here's one for them:

Fabulous Ming's hot coach of term: number one for two thousand and seven? (7, 6, 6)
by RTT - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 10:21pm
Olly Olly said: Oh that's just silly. Apologies to the 99% of people reading this who are confused.
I did say it was not for everyone. In fact, I guess it was really just aimed at you (although clearly there are plenty of others who would be able to get it).

Having said that, I like the new chant (not that I can see a great deal of use for it here).
by Olly Olly - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 10:16pm
RTT said: Sorry, no. I was originally going to use the word "masters" instead of "leaders", but decided the latter sounded better in relation to the bumps.
Oh that's just silly. Apologies to the 99% of people reading this who are confused. I prefer 'King Ming' as an answer anyway, and may chant it a few times now to reinforce that view.
by RTT - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 10:06pm
Neil T said: Is it 'King Ming'? (As in Ming Campbell, leader of the Lib Dems.)

If it isn't, it should be.
Sorry, no. I was originally going to use the word "masters" instead of "leaders", but decided the latter sounded better in relation to the bumps.
by Neil T - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 10:03pm
RTT said: A further hint to the previous one: Two years ago the clue would not have worked.
Is it 'King Ming'? (As in Ming Campbell, leader of the Lib Dems.)

If it isn't, it should be.
by RTT - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 9:39pm
Neil T said: Now how about you post one that some of us can solve, instead of one that most (indeed all) of us can't?!
A further hint to the previous one: Two years ago the clue would not have worked.
by Neil T - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 9:33pm
RTT said: 1) Valkyrie

2) Black Prince
That was quick! Now how about you post one that some of us can solve, instead of one that most (indeed all) of us can't?!

(Valkyrie: V (= 5* in Roman numerals) + A + L (= learner = novice) + KYRIE (Kylie with 'R[ight]' for 'L[eft]', i.e. 'having changed sides'). Black Prince: see here for the 'other', non-boat-burning, reference.)
by RTT - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 9:25pm
Neil T said: Two more meta-clues, as noone seems to be able to get Tom's:

She carried heroes to glory, including '5' (a novice) and a stunner who'd changed sides (8)

Who had burning desire for Fair Maid of Kent? (5, 6)

(Wikipedia might be helpful in understanding the second.)
1) Valkyrie

2) Black Prince
by Neil T - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 9:15pm
Two more meta-clues, as noone seems to be able to get Tom's:

She carried heroes to glory, including '5' (a novice) and a stunner who'd changed sides (8)

Who had burning desire for Fair Maid of Kent? (5, 6)

(Wikipedia might be helpful in understanding the second.)
by RTT - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 7:11pm
Neil T said: 1) The definition is 'A rallying cry', and the answer is formed from two shorter words (total 8 letters) meaning 'leader', e.g. 'king', 'CO', etc.
This is the correct interpretation. I'd refer you back to the qualifier stated before the clue - not everyone reading this site will be able to get it.
by gf - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 2:03pm
Bit of a guess said: clutter?
Indeed.
by Bit of a guess - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 1:24pm
gf said: How about a "meta-clue" in the meantime...

RTT clue could create chaos. (7)
clutter?
by gf - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 11:49am
How about a "meta-clue" in the meantime...

RTT clue could create chaos. (7)
by Neil T - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 11:25am
gf said: Hmm... within rally co-drivers' pacenotes, there are various four-letter words which might somehow be applicable ("bump", "fast", "easy"...) but I can't find a combination which sits well with the rest of the clue.
I'm baffled by this. The only two interpretations I can come up with are:

1) The definition is 'A rallying cry', and the answer is formed from two shorter words (total 8 letters) meaning 'leader', e.g. 'king', 'CO', etc.

2) The whole clue is a cryptic definition, possibly punning on 'rally' meaning 'to drive a car in a rally race' or 'to get better' or 'to demonstrate/protest', and with 'the two leaders' possibly referring to the double headship.
by gf - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 11:12am
RTT said: One for the venatoris:

A rallying cry for the two leaders (4,4).
Are we over-complicating this one? Could it just be "Hold fast" ???
by gf - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 11:06am
RTT said: One for the venatoris:

A rallying cry for the two leaders (4,4).
Hmm... within rally co-drivers' pacenotes, there are various four-letter words which might somehow be applicable ("bump", "fast", "easy"...) but I can't find a combination which sits well with the rest of the clue.
by Joff - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 10:44am
well yes, I got that much. didn't know if there was an additional definition or bit that I missed. I suppose 'that's what andy thinks we are' but surely the 'but different' should go next to the 'same woe'? bah. one day, one day I will understand these stupid things..
by Richard - Wed 7th Mar 2007, 10:29am
MC Chung said: same woe - that's what we are, according to Andy, but different this time! (7)
I'm not particularly good at cryptic crosswords, but "same woe" is an anagram of awesome, which seems to fit the bill.
by RTT - Tue 6th Mar 2007, 8:24pm
Neil T said: I guess one of the words is probably 'head'?
Nope.
by Neil T - Tue 6th Mar 2007, 9:49am
A rallying cry for the two leaders (4,4).
Struggling a bit with this one. I guess one of the words is probably 'head'?

A couple of people have asked for an explanation of the (6, 8) clue below, so here it is:

'First and Third decked in gold' = 'gold' with the first and third letters removed ('decked') = OD

so: 'First and Third decked in gold and blue remarkably' = OD and BLUE 'remarkably' (anagrammed) = DOUBLE

'crown' = HEAD

'end of Bumps' = S

'with it' = HIP (as in 'trendy')

and the whole clue is also the definition.
by RTT - Mon 5th Mar 2007, 12:51am
One for the venatoris:

A rallying cry for the two leaders (4,4).
by awesome! - Sun 4th Mar 2007, 11:22pm
but I don't think I got most of that clue..! (which reflects my crossword inability rather than your clue ming!)
by MC Chung - Sun 4th Mar 2007, 10:57pm
same woe - that's what we are, according to Andy, but different this time! (7)
by MC Chung - Sun 4th Mar 2007, 9:50pm
Double Headship. Not bad Neil, I'm impressed.
by Neil T - Sun 4th Mar 2007, 9:02pm
Not from tomorrow's Times Crossword (Mars Bar for the first correct answer):

First and Third decked in gold and blue remarkably crown end of Bumps with it (6, 8)
by past it - Mon 22nd Jan 2007, 10:05am
Neil T said: I don't know of anything lower than this.
Diving is.. I'd be eligible to dive 'masters'. If I could dive that is. It caters for 'adults of all abilities', so I presume the lower limit is 18.
by Neil T - Fri 28th Jul 2006, 7:59am
RTT said: We were wondering at work today which sport has the lowest age for veteran / master status. Rowing (27) is obviously pretty low, but then this is mainly because it is sub-categorised and thus flexible enough to have something approaching a fair system for any age. Still, there must be something lower. Women's gymnastics maybe (bet that'd be about 16....)?
In swimming the qualification age for 'Masters' events is 25. I don't know of anything lower than this.
by RTT - Fri 28th Jul 2006, 7:31am
We were wondering at work today which sport has the lowest age for veteran / master status. Rowing (27) is obviously pretty low, but then this is mainly because it is sub-categorised and thus flexible enough to have something approaching a fair system for any age. Still, there must be something lower. Women's gymnastics maybe (bet that'd be about 16....)?
by Neil T - Tue 25th Jul 2006, 1:55pm
Neil T said: From Saturday's Times:

Too high to catch? (10)
Answer: Ultrasonic
by Roy Walker - Mon 24th Jul 2006, 10:38am
Mike said: [me at] frontstops?
It's good, but it's not the one.
by Mike - Mon 24th Jul 2006, 10:15am
Neil T said: From Saturday's Times:

Too high to catch? (10)
[me at] frontstops?
by Neil T - Sun 23rd Jul 2006, 4:53pm
From Saturday's Times:

Too high to catch? (10)
by RTT - Wed 22nd Feb 2006, 11:30pm
Funniest clue I've seen in ages (no prizes for guessing the publication):

OBN candidate gets to be repellant penetrating a dog (10)?
by Get your PBs down - Tue 31st Jan 2006, 1:26pm
To all crossworders:

DO THE TIMES TODAY.

I have just reduced my PB to 4'04".
by Neil T - Tue 31st Jan 2006, 1:21pm
This may be too late, but...

10 RP is 10 Rillington Place, the scene of several grisly murders a la Fred West. (Also a film I think.) GET IN!!
by Simon - Tue 17th Jan 2006, 8:50pm
gf said: Depending on which one you believe from a selection of four sources I've found so far, there are 8, 9, 17 or... 10 Royal Parks.
I was in the green that is bordered by the Palace of Westminster, Millbank, and the Thames this morning, and the by-laws posted there named 20 sites which are managed by the Royal Parks.
by Mike - Tue 17th Jan 2006, 5:29pm
The Power said: 1, 18 next?
Yup. I'm ashamed to say I didn't get it at the time.
by The Power - Tue 17th Jan 2006, 3:53pm
Mike said: A nice one from Radio 1 this morning:

What is the next number in this sequence?

16, 8, 11, 14, 9, 12, 5, 20
1, 18 next?
by Mike - Tue 17th Jan 2006, 2:50pm
A nice one from Radio 1 this morning:

What is the next number in this sequence?

16, 8, 11, 14, 9, 12, 5, 20
by Andy - Tue 10th Jan 2006, 11:02am
we had this argument in the boat house, whether, a billion was, 1,000,000,000 or 1,000,000,000,000
And also whether an octillion is 10^48 or 10^27, I'm not using any of that inferior american arithmetic
by jmg - Tue 10th Jan 2006, 10:53am
Andy said: 1,000,000,000,000
Very British of you!
by Andy - Mon 9th Jan 2006, 6:01pm
Mike said: 8
3
5

And then I get stuck.
Ok, you've got it, there's no 10th or 11th term
by Mike - Mon 9th Jan 2006, 5:50pm
Andy said: What comes next in this sequence?
8
3
5

And then I get stuck.
by Andy - Mon 9th Jan 2006, 4:58pm
What comes next in this sequence?
101
1,000,000,000,000
10^48
100
1
4
by not even bothered - Thu 29th Dec 2005, 4:27pm
Tom C said: speed in a built up area
18 TITP

Eighteen Turns in the Park (its a sculpture in the Sepentine Gallery?)
by Tom C - Thu 29th Dec 2005, 2:05pm
jmg said: One of the ones we got before I posted, 180 MSITD was 'maximum score in three darts', so I'm thinking this could be maximum score in something?
speed in a built up area
by jmg - Thu 29th Dec 2005, 9:07am
jmg said: 30 MSIABUA
One of the ones we got before I posted, 180 MSITD was 'maximum score in three darts', so I'm thinking this could be maximum score in something?
by Richard - Wed 28th Dec 2005, 11:52pm
Richard said: The Royal Parks Website suggests that there are only 8 Royal Parks.
The quote from the site is;

Millions of Londoners and tourists visit the eight Royal Parks for free each year.
by Richard - Wed 28th Dec 2005, 11:51pm
gf said: Depending on which one you believe from a selection of four sources I've found so far, there are 8, 9, 17 or... 10 Royal Parks.
The Royal Parks Website suggests that there are only 8 Royal Parks. I'd say that would be a fairly reliable source
by gf - Wed 28th Dec 2005, 12:03pm
Depending on which one you believe from a selection of four sources I've found so far, there are 8, 9, 17 or... 10 Royal Parks.
by gf - Wed 28th Dec 2005, 10:43am
Is it possible that this quiz has been set by somebody non-sporty who thinks there are 18 Teams In The Premiership?
by gf - Wed 28th Dec 2005, 10:33am
mjb said: 3 Coins In A Fountain
12 Good Men And True
by mjb - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 11:13pm
3 CIAF
3 Coins In A Fountain
by Richard - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 10:44pm
4 PIAPT
4 Players In A Polo? Team
by mjb - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 10:28pm
10 DS
10 Downing Street
by Richard - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 10:16pm
22 TLD
22 - Two Little Ducks
by mjb - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 9:26pm
jmg said:

2 SDMAS
36 BKOAP
6 BIAO
7 DS
2 Swallows Don't Make A Summer
36 Black Keys On A Piano
6 Balls In An Over
7 Deadly Sins

So it's just these ones left :

18 TITP
30 MSIABUA
12 GMAT
4 PIAPT
10 DS
3 CIAF
22 TLD
10 RP
by mjb - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 9:17pm
jmg said: ... questions like "12 DOC" to which the answer is "Days of Christmas" ...
4 CB
4 Calling Birds ?
by jmg - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 6:39pm
jmg said:200 PFPG
Just got this one... pounds for passing go
by Richard - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 6:37pm
10 GB (HOTW)
10 Green Bottles (Hanging On The Wall)
by Richard - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 6:33pm
3 MFASBE
2 WDMAR
3 Minutes For A Soft Boiled Egg?

2 Wrongs Don't Make A Right?
by Richard - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 6:23pm
26 LOTA
26 Letters Of The Alphabet
by jpd - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 5:42pm
9 LOAC
9 Lives of a Cat
by jpd - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 5:39pm
5 OR
3 FIOY
5 Olympic Rings
3 Feet in One Yard
by jmg - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 5:30pm
Okay, so we've got this christmas quiz thing at home. You'll have seen the like before - questions like "12 DOC" to which the answer is "Days of Christmas". Still quite a few left, so here we go...

4 CB
10 GB (HOTW)
2 SDMAS
9 LOAC
36 BKOAP
5 OR
3 MFASBE
18 TITP
30 MSIABUA
12 GMAT
4 PIAPT
2 WDMAR
10 DS
200 PFPG
3 FIOY
3 CIAF
22 TLD
26 LOTA
6 BIAO
7 DS
10 RP

Any ideas?
by Richard - Fri 21st Oct 2005, 3:18pm
And just to keep you going here are a couple for base 8 (containing all of the numbers 1-7)

   **2
  x  *
   ---
   ***

    **
  x *6
   ---
   ***


Both have unique solutions
by Richard - Fri 21st Oct 2005, 1:00pm
Richard said: base 5: (unique solution)
  *
x *
 --
 **
Well, it's unique if you don't count swapping the two numbers being multiplied
by Richard - Fri 21st Oct 2005, 12:53pm
base 5: (unique solution)
  *
x *
 --
 **


base 6: (unique solution)
  **
 x *
 ---
  **


base 7: (2 solutions)
  **
 x *
 ---
 xxx
by Mike - Fri 21st Oct 2005, 9:27am
Dubya said: Are there similar problems in other bases than base 10?
OK: in base 4, the following contains all the digits from 1-3.

  *
+ 1
 --
  *

Or is that not quite what you had in mind?
by Dubya - Thu 20th Oct 2005, 10:12pm
jpd said: OK, you asked for it - prove this is the only solution (or otherwise).
Are there similar problems in other bases than base 10?
by jpd - Thu 20th Oct 2005, 8:04am
Richard said: Are there any other solutions?
OK, you asked for it - prove this is the only solution (or otherwise).
by Richard - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 11:54pm
jpd said:
The following multiplication contains all the digits 1-9. Fill in the blanks:
 186
  39 x
----
7254



Are there any other solutions?
by jpd - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 9:49pm
Richard said: You could also start on any circle which is

1 + 1 / (2n*pi) miles north of the South pole.
Is the right answer.

The following multiplication contains all the digits 1-9. Fill in the blanks:

 ***
  3* x
----
****
by Richard - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 8:23pm
jpd said: Is the right answer.

If we assume the small area around the South pole is flat, our start point would be any point on the circle which is 1 + 1 / (2 * pi) miles North of the South pole.

Where else could I be?
You could also start on any circle which is

1 + 1 / (2n*pi) miles north of the South pole.
by Richard - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 7:48pm
jpd said: Is that inclusive or exclusive?
If it doesn't include 1, then I think 4&13 work.

Peter is told the product, 52
Simon is told the sum, 17

52's factors are;
2&26, 4&13

Simon knows that Peter couldn't tell what the numbers were just from the product.

If Simon was told 28, then one of the possibilities for 28 are 5&23, but the product of 5&23 is 115 (which can be made in no other way) - so if Simon was told 28, then he couldn't know that Peter couldn't tell what the numbers were. Therefore Simon was told the sum 17. Peter now knows what the numbers are.

The possiblities for a sum of 17 are 2&15 (product 30), 3&14 (42), 4&13 (52), 5&12 (60), 6&11(66), 7&10(70), 8&9(72)

product 30 gives 2&15(sum 17), 3&10(13), 5&6(11)
Only a sum of 13 would be eliminated by Peter when told that Simon already knew that Peter couldn't tell what the numbers were (13 can also be 2&11 whose product 22 can only be formed in 1 way), leaving 2 remaining possibilities therefore Peter can't have worked out the right answer. Therefore it's not 2&15 as the answer.

The same argument can be used for 42,60,66,70 and 72, but not for 52.

Therefore Simon will also be able to work out that the numbers must be 4&13
by mjb - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 4:22pm
jpd said: how can you possibly walk at the centre of the Earth?
You obviously haven't read much Jules Verne then.
by jpd - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 4:11pm
Ingers said: I think of 2 integers between 1 and 100.
Is that inclusive or exclusive?

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