Message Board

Crosswords and other puzzles

For discussion of all forms of mental gymnastics, especially that baffling final clue

Message board > Crosswords and other puzzles 51 to 100 of 153
   First 50Following 50Last 50

by RTT - Fri 28th Jul 2006, 7:31am
We were wondering at work today which sport has the lowest age for veteran / master status. Rowing (27) is obviously pretty low, but then this is mainly because it is sub-categorised and thus flexible enough to have something approaching a fair system for any age. Still, there must be something lower. Women's gymnastics maybe (bet that'd be about 16....)?
by Neil T - Tue 25th Jul 2006, 1:55pm
Neil T said: From Saturday's Times:

Too high to catch? (10)
Answer: Ultrasonic
by Roy Walker - Mon 24th Jul 2006, 10:38am
Mike said: [me at] frontstops?
It's good, but it's not the one.
by Mike - Mon 24th Jul 2006, 10:15am
Neil T said: From Saturday's Times:

Too high to catch? (10)
[me at] frontstops?
by Neil T - Sun 23rd Jul 2006, 4:53pm
From Saturday's Times:

Too high to catch? (10)
by RTT - Wed 22nd Feb 2006, 11:30pm
Funniest clue I've seen in ages (no prizes for guessing the publication):

OBN candidate gets to be repellant penetrating a dog (10)?
by Get your PBs down - Tue 31st Jan 2006, 1:26pm
To all crossworders:

DO THE TIMES TODAY.

I have just reduced my PB to 4'04".
by Neil T - Tue 31st Jan 2006, 1:21pm
This may be too late, but...

10 RP is 10 Rillington Place, the scene of several grisly murders a la Fred West. (Also a film I think.) GET IN!!
by Simon - Tue 17th Jan 2006, 8:50pm
gf said: Depending on which one you believe from a selection of four sources I've found so far, there are 8, 9, 17 or... 10 Royal Parks.
I was in the green that is bordered by the Palace of Westminster, Millbank, and the Thames this morning, and the by-laws posted there named 20 sites which are managed by the Royal Parks.
by Mike - Tue 17th Jan 2006, 5:29pm
The Power said: 1, 18 next?
Yup. I'm ashamed to say I didn't get it at the time.
by The Power - Tue 17th Jan 2006, 3:53pm
Mike said: A nice one from Radio 1 this morning:

What is the next number in this sequence?

16, 8, 11, 14, 9, 12, 5, 20
1, 18 next?
by Mike - Tue 17th Jan 2006, 2:50pm
A nice one from Radio 1 this morning:

What is the next number in this sequence?

16, 8, 11, 14, 9, 12, 5, 20
by Andy - Tue 10th Jan 2006, 11:02am
we had this argument in the boat house, whether, a billion was, 1,000,000,000 or 1,000,000,000,000
And also whether an octillion is 10^48 or 10^27, I'm not using any of that inferior american arithmetic
by jmg - Tue 10th Jan 2006, 10:53am
Andy said: 1,000,000,000,000
Very British of you!
by Andy - Mon 9th Jan 2006, 6:01pm
Mike said: 8
3
5

And then I get stuck.
Ok, you've got it, there's no 10th or 11th term
by Mike - Mon 9th Jan 2006, 5:50pm
Andy said: What comes next in this sequence?
8
3
5

And then I get stuck.
by Andy - Mon 9th Jan 2006, 4:58pm
What comes next in this sequence?
101
1,000,000,000,000
10^48
100
1
4
by not even bothered - Thu 29th Dec 2005, 4:27pm
Tom C said: speed in a built up area
18 TITP

Eighteen Turns in the Park (its a sculpture in the Sepentine Gallery?)
by Tom C - Thu 29th Dec 2005, 2:05pm
jmg said: One of the ones we got before I posted, 180 MSITD was 'maximum score in three darts', so I'm thinking this could be maximum score in something?
speed in a built up area
by jmg - Thu 29th Dec 2005, 9:07am
jmg said: 30 MSIABUA
One of the ones we got before I posted, 180 MSITD was 'maximum score in three darts', so I'm thinking this could be maximum score in something?
by Richard - Wed 28th Dec 2005, 11:52pm
Richard said: The Royal Parks Website suggests that there are only 8 Royal Parks.
The quote from the site is;

Millions of Londoners and tourists visit the eight Royal Parks for free each year.
by Richard - Wed 28th Dec 2005, 11:51pm
gf said: Depending on which one you believe from a selection of four sources I've found so far, there are 8, 9, 17 or... 10 Royal Parks.
The Royal Parks Website suggests that there are only 8 Royal Parks. I'd say that would be a fairly reliable source
by gf - Wed 28th Dec 2005, 12:03pm
Depending on which one you believe from a selection of four sources I've found so far, there are 8, 9, 17 or... 10 Royal Parks.
by gf - Wed 28th Dec 2005, 10:43am
Is it possible that this quiz has been set by somebody non-sporty who thinks there are 18 Teams In The Premiership?
by gf - Wed 28th Dec 2005, 10:33am
mjb said: 3 Coins In A Fountain
12 Good Men And True
by mjb - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 11:13pm
3 CIAF
3 Coins In A Fountain
by Richard - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 10:44pm
4 PIAPT
4 Players In A Polo? Team
by mjb - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 10:28pm
10 DS
10 Downing Street
by Richard - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 10:16pm
22 TLD
22 - Two Little Ducks
by mjb - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 9:26pm
jmg said:

2 SDMAS
36 BKOAP
6 BIAO
7 DS
2 Swallows Don't Make A Summer
36 Black Keys On A Piano
6 Balls In An Over
7 Deadly Sins

So it's just these ones left :

18 TITP
30 MSIABUA
12 GMAT
4 PIAPT
10 DS
3 CIAF
22 TLD
10 RP
by mjb - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 9:17pm
jmg said: ... questions like "12 DOC" to which the answer is "Days of Christmas" ...
4 CB
4 Calling Birds ?
by jmg - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 6:39pm
jmg said:200 PFPG
Just got this one... pounds for passing go
by Richard - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 6:37pm
10 GB (HOTW)
10 Green Bottles (Hanging On The Wall)
by Richard - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 6:33pm
3 MFASBE
2 WDMAR
3 Minutes For A Soft Boiled Egg?

2 Wrongs Don't Make A Right?
by Richard - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 6:23pm
26 LOTA
26 Letters Of The Alphabet
by jpd - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 5:42pm
9 LOAC
9 Lives of a Cat
by jpd - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 5:39pm
5 OR
3 FIOY
5 Olympic Rings
3 Feet in One Yard
by jmg - Tue 27th Dec 2005, 5:30pm
Okay, so we've got this christmas quiz thing at home. You'll have seen the like before - questions like "12 DOC" to which the answer is "Days of Christmas". Still quite a few left, so here we go...

4 CB
10 GB (HOTW)
2 SDMAS
9 LOAC
36 BKOAP
5 OR
3 MFASBE
18 TITP
30 MSIABUA
12 GMAT
4 PIAPT
2 WDMAR
10 DS
200 PFPG
3 FIOY
3 CIAF
22 TLD
26 LOTA
6 BIAO
7 DS
10 RP

Any ideas?
by Richard - Fri 21st Oct 2005, 3:18pm
And just to keep you going here are a couple for base 8 (containing all of the numbers 1-7)

   **2
  x  *
   ---
   ***

    **
  x *6
   ---
   ***


Both have unique solutions
by Richard - Fri 21st Oct 2005, 1:00pm
Richard said: base 5: (unique solution)
  *
x *
 --
 **
Well, it's unique if you don't count swapping the two numbers being multiplied
by Richard - Fri 21st Oct 2005, 12:53pm
base 5: (unique solution)
  *
x *
 --
 **


base 6: (unique solution)
  **
 x *
 ---
  **


base 7: (2 solutions)
  **
 x *
 ---
 xxx
by Mike - Fri 21st Oct 2005, 9:27am
Dubya said: Are there similar problems in other bases than base 10?
OK: in base 4, the following contains all the digits from 1-3.

  *
+ 1
 --
  *

Or is that not quite what you had in mind?
by Dubya - Thu 20th Oct 2005, 10:12pm
jpd said: OK, you asked for it - prove this is the only solution (or otherwise).
Are there similar problems in other bases than base 10?
by jpd - Thu 20th Oct 2005, 8:04am
Richard said: Are there any other solutions?
OK, you asked for it - prove this is the only solution (or otherwise).
by Richard - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 11:54pm
jpd said:
The following multiplication contains all the digits 1-9. Fill in the blanks:
 186
  39 x
----
7254



Are there any other solutions?
by jpd - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 9:49pm
Richard said: You could also start on any circle which is

1 + 1 / (2n*pi) miles north of the South pole.
Is the right answer.

The following multiplication contains all the digits 1-9. Fill in the blanks:

 ***
  3* x
----
****
by Richard - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 8:23pm
jpd said: Is the right answer.

If we assume the small area around the South pole is flat, our start point would be any point on the circle which is 1 + 1 / (2 * pi) miles North of the South pole.

Where else could I be?
You could also start on any circle which is

1 + 1 / (2n*pi) miles north of the South pole.
by Richard - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 7:48pm
jpd said: Is that inclusive or exclusive?
If it doesn't include 1, then I think 4&13 work.

Peter is told the product, 52
Simon is told the sum, 17

52's factors are;
2&26, 4&13

Simon knows that Peter couldn't tell what the numbers were just from the product.

If Simon was told 28, then one of the possibilities for 28 are 5&23, but the product of 5&23 is 115 (which can be made in no other way) - so if Simon was told 28, then he couldn't know that Peter couldn't tell what the numbers were. Therefore Simon was told the sum 17. Peter now knows what the numbers are.

The possiblities for a sum of 17 are 2&15 (product 30), 3&14 (42), 4&13 (52), 5&12 (60), 6&11(66), 7&10(70), 8&9(72)

product 30 gives 2&15(sum 17), 3&10(13), 5&6(11)
Only a sum of 13 would be eliminated by Peter when told that Simon already knew that Peter couldn't tell what the numbers were (13 can also be 2&11 whose product 22 can only be formed in 1 way), leaving 2 remaining possibilities therefore Peter can't have worked out the right answer. Therefore it's not 2&15 as the answer.

The same argument can be used for 42,60,66,70 and 72, but not for 52.

Therefore Simon will also be able to work out that the numbers must be 4&13
by mjb - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 4:22pm
jpd said: how can you possibly walk at the centre of the Earth?
You obviously haven't read much Jules Verne then.
by jpd - Wed 19th Oct 2005, 4:11pm
Ingers said: I think of 2 integers between 1 and 100.
Is that inclusive or exclusive?

Show 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 First 50Following 50Last 50


Facebook Instagram LinkedIn Twitter
If you have any comments or suggestions please email the webmaster. Click here to switch to the darker, gold on blue, design. If you log in as a First and Third member, you can set a preference for a color scheme on your profile.
^ top